Board Meeting Summary | Nov. 20, 2018

Petra Butler Resigns from Board

Board President Andrew Caplan announced the resignation of District 3 board member Petra Butler, effective Dec. 31, 2018. Butler represents the board on the Chamber of Commerce, Comprehensive Guidance Committee, Summit County Wellness Alliance, Latino Advocacy Committee, and the Park City Education Association. “Petra was an integral part in developing the district’s Strategic Plan, selecting our new Superintendent, and advocating for improving the safety and security in our schools. She has always had the best interests of our students and employees at the center of all she does. Her experience and knowledge will be greatly missed,” Caplan said.

The board will accept applications to fill the District 3 vacancy until Jan. 7, 2019, at 6 p.m. Applications can be emailed to President Caplan at acaplan@pcschools.us.  Interviews will be conducted during the Jan. 14, 2019, board meeting which begins at 4 p.m. The application and additional information can be found here.

PCEA Report

PCEA submitted written comments to the board welcoming Kara Hendrickson, the new board member elected to fill JJ Ehlers’ seat in District 4. PCEA also applauded the district’s efforts to eliminate class rank at the high school, convene an assessment committee, and include educator voices in the education master planning process. The association also reported that safety is still a concern at the high school, and that it is disappointed with Question 1 not passing during the election.

Board Member Reports

– President Caplan expressed appreciation to the community for its generous support of school programs and students during the recent Live PC Give PC event. This year, the event raised the highest amount every given to schools.

– Vice President JJ Ehlers thanked the Superintendent for her recent presentation to the Sunrise Rotary members.

Superintendent Report

Superintendent Jill Gildea reviewed the history and framework for implementation of standards-based learning (SBL). SBL is a method of providing feedback that is purely academic in nature and a more accurate reflection of what the student actually knows and can do. This allows teachers to identify better what support students need to reach their potential. SBL is currently used at Ecker Hill Middle and report cards reflect the philosophy. More than half of Treasure Mountain Junior High teachers are using an SBL scale to assess learning. Individual teachers and department at Park City High are also using SBL scales, and elementary schools are exploring the use of SBL. The district is creating a task force to define what reporting looks like in all schools (K-12). The district will also provide SBL training for school teams and is assisting schools, as needed.

Education Master Plan Update

Christine Richman, GSBS consultant, updated the board about the education master plan Community Open House and Future of Learning Summit. She said the Open House was well attended with many people who have not been involved in previous master planning activities. The all-day Summit resulted in a draft of guiding principles for education in PCSD. She said once the Steering Committee has an understanding and consensus about the education approach of the district, then it can begin to look at aligning facilities with that educational blueprint.

Board Approves Open Enrollment at McPolin Elementary

For the 2019-20 school year, the board approved closing schools to open enrollment, with the exception of McPolin Elementary. Students living outside district boundaries will only be eligible to enroll at McPolin. Parents are reminded that McPolin is an all Spanish dual-immersion school.

Board Goals

The board approved goals in the areas of communication, governance, education master planning, analysis, organization, and safety. The board will provide updates on three of the goals each month.

Audit Report

Park City School District accepted the audit report from Squire & Company, who issued an unmodified opinion in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. An unmodified opinion means the district’s independent auditing firm expressed an opinion that financial statements are in accordance with applicable state and federal financial reporting frameworks.

Policies for Posting

– Policy 3000: Shared Decision Making

– Policy 5010: Inventory Control and Use of Equipment

– Policy 5025: Student Transportation for School or District Activities

– Policy 7031: Social Media (new policy)

– Policy 7160: Orderly Termination

– Policy 9025: Student Wellness (board amended to include “schools may only use non-food based rewards for student behavior, achievement, and celebrations.”)

Patron Comments

Case Schemmer, an eighth-grade student at Treasure Mountain Junior High, spoke on his personal experience with standards-based grading scales.

PCHS Custodian Selected as Utah’s 2019 Outstanding Education Support Professional

 Park City High School custodian Candelario “Cande” Ponce was recognized as Utah’s 2019 Outstanding Education Support Professional of the Year during a surprise assembly at the high school today, Tuesday, Nov. 20. Park City School District administrators along with leaders from both the Utah School Employees Association (USEA) and the Park City Classified Employees Association (PCCEA) joined students and staff in honoring Ponce as their unsung hero.

Education support professionals (ESP) are the support staff — clerical services, custodial and maintenance, food services, health and student services, paraeducators, security services, skilled trade services, technical services and transportation services — who work tirelessly to ensure students are healthy, safe, engaged, challenged and supported.

As the winner of USEA’s award, Ponce will be Utah’s nominee to the National Education Association’s ESP of the Year. He will attend the national conference in March 2019 in Las Vegas. Ponce will also travel throughout the state to meet members, raise awareness of ESP issues and advocate on their behalf.

Ponce has been a custodian at Park City High since 2009. “Schools today are filled with many young people who are hurting emotionally and struggling with self-identity,” says PCHS biology teacher Ed Mulick. “To have a humble, caring role model like Cande present in our school and taking interest in others, helps create an environment of security, peace, and acceptance…his strong dedication to his job represents the essence of his character.”

A father of five, he and his wife own a successful food business open 12 hours a day, seven days a week – all while working full-time as a school custodian. “All who know Cande and his calm and humble way tend to gravitate to him,” says Maryann Gilmore, Area 4 USEA Executive Board member.

PCHS junior selected for inaugural statewide Student Advisory Council

Daniel Bernhardt

Daniel Bernhardt, a junior at Park City High School, is one of 15 students appointed by the Utah State Board of Education’s inaugural Student Advisory Council.

“The students will advise the USBE on issues relevant to high school students throughout the state,” according to a press release from the USBE. “They were selected following an application period this fall after the USBE approved a new policy establishing the council.”

Students appointed to the council represent both traditional and charter  schools. They will be advising the board of student issues such as: mental health and bullying, racism and discrimination, access to STEM and technology, homelessness, LGBTQ challenges, students with disabilities, college readiness, and school funding.

The SAC will meet at least every other month to discuss how decisions made at the state level affect students.

PCHS outscores state, nation on ACT

Park City High School graduates outscored their counterparts in Utah and across the country on the 2018 ACT (American College Test)

PCHS had a composite score of 23.7, compared to Utah’s composite of 20.4 and the national composite of 20.8.  Park City graduates have seen a steady increase in ACT scores the past four years

“We have amazing students and teachers,” said Principal Roger Arbabi. “The results are an indication of rigor in the classroom and college readiness.”

Scores by section include:

English: 23.6  compared to 19.4 in Utah, 20.2 nationally

Mathematics: 22.6 compared to 19.9 in Utah, 20.5 nationally

Reading: 24.3 compared to 20.0 in Utah, 21.3 nationally

Science: 23.8 compared to 20.5 in Utah, 20.7 nationally

The ACT is is designed to measure skills needed for success in first-year college coursework.  ACT Research has shown that it is the rigor of coursework – rather than simply the number of core courses – that has the greatest impact on ACT performance and college readiness.

Some 390 PCHS students took the ACT in 2018, 43,791 students took the ACT statewide, and nearly 2 million students nationwide took the ACT in 2017-18.

Police and District Ask Parents to Help Ensure Drug-Free Schools

Student safety and well being is paramount. The Park City community cares about the health and well-being of each student.

Park City School District Superintendent Jill Gildea is asking parents to work with the district and law enforcement to ensure safe and drug-free schools remain the norm.

Vaping devicesNationally and locally, schools are confiscating a variety of drug paraphernalia including vaping devices. Since the start of the school year, Park City School District staff have recovered drug paraphernalia in a variety of vaping devices (see photo).

“It is not appropriate for students to bring tobacco, alcohol, or drugs to the learning environment,” said Superintendent Jill Gildea. “Our students have a right to expect a safe and drug-free learning environment. Prevention education, disciplinary consequences, and appropriate interventions and supports are provided to students who are found to have brought e-cigarettes, tobacco, or any drug or look-alike substance to schools.”

One such incident occurred today when a 9th grade student was transported to the hospital after a medical incident. The student allegedly smoked THC from a vaping pen. The 9th-grade student who provided the THC was referred to police.

Park City Police remind parents to check their students’ backpacks, bedrooms, and cars for drug and vaping paraphernalia. Those parents who need additional resources related to substance abuse should contact the Summit County Health Department.

“It’s important we get this information in the hands of parents,” said Park City Police Chief Wade Carpenter. “We cannot deal with the issue alone. We need to enlist the help of parents and peers.”

If anyone locates anything suspicious they should contact law enforcement immediately.


News Media Contacts:

– Melinda Colton, Park City School District Communications Director, 801-631-7770

–Capt. Phil Kirk, Park City Police Department PIO, 435-731-0082

District Introduces Community to ‘The Future of Learning’ Process

Park City School District successfully launched its education master planning process, The Future of Learning, this week by seeking feedback early in the process from the community.

Monday, Oct. 29, the district held a Community Engagement Open House, with nearly 100 members of the community participating in the two sessions. “We were thrilled to see students, parents, teachers, and community members attend the open house,” said Superintendent Jill Gildea. “It allowed us the opportunity to seek ideas and input as we begin this process.”

Those attending were asked what they believe the single most important outcome of the process should be. Some responses included an environment that support the whole child, incorporating critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, communications, cultural proficiency, and mastery-based proficiency, and having programs in place that will focus on careers in the world ahead.

“This process is focused on how the community anticipates teaching and learning to look in the coming years,” said Superintendent Gildea. “This is not about buildings but rather how education should drive the needs for our facilities.”

Tuesday, Oct. 30, the district held an all-day “The Future of Learning Summit” and invited 75 students, parents, teachers, principals, and business leaders to discuss the community’s vision for the education. “It was a rare opportunity to really discuss what our students will need in the future to be successful learners,” Superintendent Gildea said.

Some of the major themes that evolved from the summit included: student-centered learning as a top priority, building relationships and trust, having meaningful engagements, providing positive, health and safe learning environments that are flexible and adaptable, and being committed to an inclusive community.

The information gleaned from the summit will be shared with the Steering Committee at its next meeting on Nov. 6 in an effort to develop guiding principles for learning.

Superintendent Gildea encourages the public to stay involved throughout the yearlong process. A devoted website on The Future of Learning can be found at pcfutureoflearning.com. The community is asked to click on the “Get Involved” tab and let the district know what are the top three skills a Park City High graduate should have?”

Community Invited to Education Master Plan Open House

Park City School District is embarking on The Future of Learning, an education master planning process that looks at ways students will learn in the future.  Once complete, the education master plan will serve as a blueprint to guide educational program development, facility investments and ultimately student success.

The community is invited to attend Park City School District’s education master plan Open House on Monday, Oct. 29. Two sessions will be held — 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. — at the Summit County Sheldon Richins Building, 1885 W. Ute Boulevard in Park City.

The purpose of the Open House is to:

– Engage the community early in the planning process

– Review the process and timeline

– Conduct a planning exercise

– Inform the public how to be involved throughout the process

– Answer questions

For more information about the education master planning process, visit the district’s website, and click on The Future of Learning tab.

 

PCSD Announces 2018-19 Enrollment

Park City School District’s official enrollment count for the 2018-19 school year is 4,780—a decrease of 37 students compared to last year (-.8 percent decrease).

The district had fewer kindergarten and first-grade students come into the system than projected, according to Business Administrator Todd Hauber. Open enrollment was closed at all schools this year, which also had an impact districtwide. He said the district has also been experiencing an enrollment bubble, which is now moving through the secondary schools.

“Most significant is that the outgoing senior class of 398 students was replaced with an incoming Kindergarten class of 266. This 139 difference offsets the growth leading to the overall decrease in enrollment,” Hauber said. “Additionally, we had anticipated a larger kindergarten enrollment, particularly at McPolin Elementary. The increase in enrollment was not realized.”

Enrollment by School 

–Jeremy Ranch Elementary: 546  (+7)

–McPolin Elementary: 380 (-27)

–Parley’s Park Elementary: 522 (-33)

–Trailside Elementary: 461 (-38)

–Ecker Hill Middle: 805 (+31)

–Treasure Mountain Junior High: 813 (-1)

–Park City High: 1,253 (+24)

Board Meeting Summary | Oct. 16, 2018

Oath of Office

Dr. Jill Gildea was officially sworn in as Superintendent of Schools by Business Administrator Todd Hauber.

Education Master Plan

Chris Guarino with NV5, who represents the district in the education master planning process, provided the board with updates and upcoming events . The process, called “The Future of Learning,” will focus on transparency, communications, and engaging the public in a two-way process.

Monday, Oct. 29, is the Community Engagement Open House at the Richins Building Auditorium with two sessions planned at  5:30 and 6:30 p.m. The community is invited to attend so they can be introduced to the process and provide input on what they think learning will look like in the coming years.

Tuesday, Oct. 30, is The Future of Learning Summit. The district has invited educators, specific community members, and the Steering Committee to take part in an all-day Summit to look at how instruction will determine the district’s educational planning for the future.

Support Staff Discussion

Board members expressed interest in additional information related to part-time staff. McPolin Elementary Principal Bob Edmiston said that longevity in a position ultimately benefits the students. He said offering full-time employment with benefits is a powerful incentive and will provide higher quality candidates for openings. Business Administrator Todd Hauber asked the board to look at the hours support staff are needed in schools and what service level is needed, and if it is sustainable.

Enrollment Report

The official Oct. 1 enrollment count is 4,780 students  — a decrease of 37 students compared to last year. The district had fewer kindergarten and first-grade students  come into the system than projected. Open enrollment was closed at all schools this year which had an impact districtwide.

School Enrollments: 

–Jeremy Ranch Elementary: 546  (+7)

–McPolin Elementary: 380 (-27)

–Parley’s Park Elementary: 522 (-33)

–Trailside Elementary: 461 (-38)

–Ecker Hill Middle: 805 (+31)

–Treasure Mountain Junior High: 813 (-1)

–Park City High: 1,253 (+24)

PCSD Launches ‘The Future of Learning’ Education Master Plan

Park City School District is collaborating with the collective community during the 2018-19 school year asking what they want learning to look like in the coming years. The nine-month project will ultimately produce a community-based education vision and a proposed system to deliver on that vision.

“The Future of Learning” will be the roadmap to the future for the school district,” said Superintendent Jill Gildea. “We will be asking educators, students, parents, and community members what they want learning to look like in the coming years and how that will be implemented in our District.”

Superintendent Gildea said previous master planning for the district was designed to address specific building needs. But this process focuses on how today’s students learn and how the environment and teaching methods can best support that – both now and in the future.

GSBS, a consulting firm in Salt Lake City, is assisting the district with this planning. The four-step process will include:

– Identify the community’s vision;

– Create guiding principles and education specifications;

– Analyze existing facilities as they relate to the principles, and;

– Provide final recommendations for implementation.

Community Steering Committee Created

Earlier this summer the district invited community members to volunteer for its education master planning Steering Committee. This committee will ensure that all groups have a voice and the opportunity to be involved in this long-term educational planning. The Steering Committee held its first meeting in September.

Community Engagement Open House

The community will have its first opportunity to engage with the team and the process during an evening open house on Monday, Oct. 29, at the Summit County Sheldon Richins Building Auditorium. Sessions will be held at 5:30 and 6:30 p.m.

The Future of Learning Summit

The following day, Oct. 30, the district has invited teachers, community members, students and the Steering Committee to attend a day-long “The Future of Learning Summit” held at the District Office from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will be recorded and posted to the District’s website under “The Future of Learning” tab.

Workshops

Over the next six months, the consultant team will host six additional “mini” workshops with various segments of the community to generate educator and community input into the educational specifications surrounding pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, learning spaces, and student learning experience.

Additionally, there will two more open houses (December and April) that will seek the community’s feedback on the progress made at the summit and workshops. The community will also be asked for input through a series of online surveys.

Final Recommendations

Once the education specifications have been created, the consulting team will evaluate existing facilities for alignment and the ability to deliver the education specifications. Final recommendations, including education specifications, potential facility needs, and funding will be presented to the Board of Education in May 2019.

Learn More

For more detailed information visit The Future of Learning section on the district’s website.