District Adds Propane School Buses to its Fleet

Park City School District is celebrating the holidays early this year with the delivery of two new propane school buses.

Rich Eddington, Director of Transportation, said alternative fuel is now a reality in the school district. “We are starting with only two buses to see how propane handles in the snow and cold weather.”

Propane buses are more economical to purchases, $125,000 per propane bus versus $159,000 for a diesel bus. “About 10 percent of buses sold nationwide are now propane,” Eddington said. “Propane is the best alternative fuel for our district.”

The district is in the process of installing its own tank at the Transportation Department. Propane gas averages $1.41 per gallon, much less expensive than diesel. “We want to be good stewards of taxpayer dollars and the environment,” he said.

Propane buses are quieter, start in 50 below zero temperatures, heat the cabin quicker, and are one of the industry’s most popular because of their lower cost and safety features, according to Eddington.

Buses 32 and 33 are currently assigned to routes that transport students to Trailside Elementary, Ecker Middle, and Treasure Mountain / Park City High Schools.

The district is in the process of upgrading and updating its bus fleet, and is applying for state and federal grants to help offset the costs for new alternative fuel buses.

PCHS junior selected for inaugural statewide Student Advisory Council

Daniel Bernhardt

Daniel Bernhardt, a junior at Park City High School, is one of 15 students appointed by the Utah State Board of Education’s inaugural Student Advisory Council.

“The students will advise the USBE on issues relevant to high school students throughout the state,” according to a press release from the USBE. “They were selected following an application period this fall after the USBE approved a new policy establishing the council.”

Students appointed to the council represent both traditional and charter  schools. They will be advising the board of student issues such as: mental health and bullying, racism and discrimination, access to STEM and technology, homelessness, LGBTQ challenges, students with disabilities, college readiness, and school funding.

The SAC will meet at least every other month to discuss how decisions made at the state level affect students.

District Introduces Community to ‘The Future of Learning’ Process

Park City School District successfully launched its education master planning process, The Future of Learning, this week by seeking feedback early in the process from the community.

Monday, Oct. 29, the district held a Community Engagement Open House, with nearly 100 members of the community participating in the two sessions. “We were thrilled to see students, parents, teachers, and community members attend the open house,” said Superintendent Jill Gildea. “It allowed us the opportunity to seek ideas and input as we begin this process.”

Those attending were asked what they believe the single most important outcome of the process should be. Some responses included an environment that support the whole child, incorporating critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, communications, cultural proficiency, and mastery-based proficiency, and having programs in place that will focus on careers in the world ahead.

“This process is focused on how the community anticipates teaching and learning to look in the coming years,” said Superintendent Gildea. “This is not about buildings but rather how education should drive the needs for our facilities.”

Tuesday, Oct. 30, the district held an all-day “The Future of Learning Summit” and invited 75 students, parents, teachers, principals, and business leaders to discuss the community’s vision for the education. “It was a rare opportunity to really discuss what our students will need in the future to be successful learners,” Superintendent Gildea said.

Some of the major themes that evolved from the summit included: student-centered learning as a top priority, building relationships and trust, having meaningful engagements, providing positive, health and safe learning environments that are flexible and adaptable, and being committed to an inclusive community.

The information gleaned from the summit will be shared with the Steering Committee at its next meeting on Nov. 6 in an effort to develop guiding principles for learning.

Superintendent Gildea encourages the public to stay involved throughout the yearlong process. A devoted website on The Future of Learning can be found at pcfutureoflearning.com. The community is asked to click on the “Get Involved” tab and let the district know what are the top three skills a Park City High graduate should have?”

New Lunch Menu Piloted at Jeremy Ranch Elementary

Students attending Jeremy Ranch Elementary will get the chance to taste 24 new lunch items during the month of October. The school is piloting the district’s new menu that provides healthier options for students.

The new menu officially kicks off Monday, Oct. 1, during lunch that is served from 11 to 12:30 p.m. The menu will feature  roasted chicken thigh’s with homemade barbecue sauce, homemade potato salad, Kodiak Cakes cornbread, a salad bar featuring fresh fruits and vegetables, freshly prepared sandwiches, and a hummus and pita plate. Student, parents, and staff are invited Monday to try the new menu items for themselves. (Student meals are $2.25 and adult meals are $3.50.)

R.J. Owen, director of Child Nutrition Services, said the menu items will feature more scratch cooking and more offerings of fruits and vegetables. “Every day we will serve 2-3 fruit and 5-6 vegetable options during lunch. The district’s goal is to make Park City School District a leader in the field of school nutrition.”

Owen also said the benefits of school lunch include: prepared hot meals, nutritionally balanced meals, and improved attendance and test scores through a healthier diet.

Adding healthier options to the menu is expensive, Owen said, but can be sustainable over time if the district increases the number of students participating in the breakfast and lunch programs. He invites students to try school lunch, especially in October when new items are being featured.

Some of the homemade items that will be piloted at Jeremy Ranch Elementary in October include: Hawaiian chicken and fresh vegetable stir fry, cheesy chicken pasta with basil, fresh roasted flatbread, sesame noodles with chicken and fresh vegetables, and shredded pork tacos.

Click here to view the October lunch menu at Jeremy Ranch Elementary.

Sept. 10 Front Line Blue Line Focused on Dark Web, Harmful Drugs

Parents are invited Monday, Sept. 10, to spend an evening with law enforcement learning about drugs and the Dark Web. “The Front Line Blue Line — Parents and Police Working Together,” is presented by the Summit County Sheriff’s Office and members of the Summit County Mental Wellness Alliance.

“Educating parents on issues affecting our student is a subject that is incredibly important,” said Dr. Ben Belnap, Associate Superintendent of Student Wellness. “This is one of the most important events our parents can attend all year.”

The event, which is for parents only, begins at 6 p.m. at the Eccles Center.  Park City School District Superintendent Jill Gildea will welcome parents, and remarks will be give by Sheriff Justin Martinez, Park City Police Chief Wade Carpenter, Lt. Greg Winterton (drugs and harmful substances), and Special Agent Clinton Kehr (the Dark Web) from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

The Dark Web is a subset of the dark web or deep web, is a place where illegal activity thrives and criminals function in perceived anonymity. Illegal drugs are one of the most dangerous categories of goods marketed on the Dark net, according to the Department of Homeland Security.

Following the speakers, a resource fair featuring 20 community partners will be held in the Park City High gym.

Free childcare will be available for children ages 4-11.

NOTE: The community is also invited to attend an Open House from 5-6 p.m. in the lower lobby of the Eccles Center to meet the district’s new Superintendent, Dr. Jill Gildea.

KPCW Story

Park Record Article

PCSD to Hire Deputy Superintendent to Focus on Operational Services

Park City School District announced today it will hire a Deputy Superintendent to lead the day-to-day operational side of the district. The position will be responsible for master facility planning, safety and security coordination, transportation, child nutrition, and school operations.

This new administrator will partner with incoming Superintendent Jill Gildea and other executive leadership to develop and implement the Board of Education’s strategic plan, district policies, instructional programs, and school services provided by the district.

In light of the multi-million dollars the board is invested in safety and security, the Deputy Superintendent will oversee the daily operations of safety measures throughout the district. He/she will oversee safety training of all employees, collaborate with safety and emergency officials in the city and county, chair the district safety committee, stay informed on best practices, and ensure safety drills are conducted on a regular basis at the district and school levels.

“As we rebuild the administration, Dr. Gildea and the board agree on the need for a Deputy Superintendent to assist in the day-to day running of the district,” said Board President Andrew Caplan. “Dr. Gildea will spend the majority of her time on improving instruction and working with our principals.

“We are looking for someone with expertise in safety and managing the physical plant. We also need someone to oversee operations of the district in order to achieve our community’s vision and mission of highly effective schools focused on student and staff well-being, safety and security, and overall progress in meeting the community’s expectations for its facilities.”

The Deputy Superintendent will guide the master facility planning process and lead efforts to successfully fund facility projects and programs. He/she will also supervise schedules and calendars of timely work projects and processes.

The posting can be viewed here.  The deadline for applications is Aug. 31.

PCSD Community Education Offers Fun Adventures This Summer

There’s more to summer than video games or sheer boredom. With more than 100 class offerings, students can experience a fun and educational summer thanks to the district’s Community Education program.

“During the summer, we concentrate on programs for youths and teens, said Jane Toly, Leisure Living coordinator. “We’ll have many more adult classes in the fall, starting in late September.”

For preschool-aged children, there are offerings such as Animal Safari, Art, Diggin’ Dinosaurs Jr., Kids Yoga, and Bubbles & Water Science Fun.

For elementary students there is Beginning Chess, Drawing & Painting, Cartoonpalooza, Movie Star Camp, Cooking, Science, Digital Moviemaking, Lego Robotics, and much more.

Some classes begin next week. For a complete listing of summer offerings, view The Compass here.

Click here to register online or call Jane Toly at 435-615-0215.

Summer School Online Registration Now Open

Summer is a great break from school but not a great break from learning. That’s why Park City School District is excited to offer Summer School again this year for students in grades 1-8, starting June 18. Online registration is now open.

This is the first summer the district is offer sessions for students going in to grades 7 and 8.  Secondary Summer School will be based on project learning with field trips to the Egyptian Theater, and enjoying activities such as yoga, hiking, paddle boarding, street art, break dancing, and art. Students will also take part in service projects.

The secondary Summer School, held at Treasure Mountain Junior High, runs June 18-July 12, Monday through Thursday. The elementary Summer School, held at McPolin Elementary, runs June 18-July 26, Monday through Thursday.  Cost is $100 and includes breakfast and lunch.

Summer School provides social, cultural and academic benefits, according to Todd Klarich, director of Community Education for PCSD. “We provide a safe, healthy and engaging environment for all students to reduce the impact of the summer slide,” he said. “And we provide opportunities for students to build self esteem, independence, and problem-solving skills while participating in hands-on activities in our community.”

Online registration is available here.

Community Members Needed for Master Planning Steering Committee

Park City School District is soliciting interested community members to be a part of its master planning steering committee. The district is seeking a diverse stakeholder group representation as part of this committee.

The district has retained NV5 as its owner representative for the master planning process.  An executive committee has been formed and is now in the process of  building a steering committee that ensures all stakeholder groups have a voice and the opportunity to be involved in this longterm planning process.

Those interested are invited to complete the steering committee application is below.

Steering Committee Application (English)

Steering Committee Application (Spanish)

Deadline for applications is June 7 at 3 p.m. The steering committee will not begin meeting until August.

Please complete the application and return it to Park City School District Office, 2700 Kearns Boulevard, (Attention: Todd Hauber) or email it directly to NV5 at desi.navarro@nv5.com.

Show Your Pedal Pride on Friday, May 18

In partnership with the Park City Municipal and Summit County, Park City School District is asking students and parents to show their pedal pride during its annual “Bike to Work, School and Play Day” on Friday, May 18.

The event is an opportunity to remind students about safety and the importance of bicycles as great options transportation and recreation.

Those biking to school should meet at 7:50 a.m. at PC MARC, Aspen Villas, Arches Park (south side of Comstock) or Park City Heights (meet at 7:30 a.m.). The route, along Kearns Boulevard, will lead the cyclists to the Park City High. Law enforcement, Park City staff, parent volunteers and teachers, will be assisting with the ride that morning to ensure safety along the route.

The Park City High School visitor’s parking lot will be a community hub for bicyclists, parents and students from 7:30-10 a.m., with breakfast served and bicycle safety materials and bike tune-ups.

The Snyderville Basin will be hosting snag and swag booths that morning from 7:30-8:15 a.m. at Trailside, Jeremy Ranch and Parley’s Park Elementary Schools.  That afternoon at Trailside Park (upper parking lot) there will be a bike obstacle course, helmet fitting, barbecue, and safety demonstrations from 1-3 p.m.

At McPolin Elementary, a Bicycle Rodeo for students will be held from 11 a.m. to noon. The PCHS Mountain Bike Club will set up the rodeo, the school’s Bici Club will wash and tune-up bikes, a parent volunteer will be conducting helmet fittings, and representatives from Park City Municipal will provide safe riding tips.

Parents and students not able to bike to school tomorrow (May 18), are invited to attend breakfast at PCHS (7:30-10 a.m.) or lunch at Trailside Park (1-3 p.m.).

The Park City area has received numerous accolades as a bike-friendly city, and the League of American Bicyclists recognized Park City Snyderville Basin Community with a Gold Level Bicycle Friendly Community award — the only community in Utah to receive the Gold-level award.

Park City School District is happy to partner with Park City Chamber, Summit County Health Department, Summit County Sheriff’s Department, Park City Police Department, Mountain Trails Foundation, Snyderville Basin Recreation, Park City Municipal, and Summit County to conduct this community-wide event.