McGuire Family Foundation establishes first-ever Student Service Award

Park City students have been making an impact in our community and throughout the world for many years through the volunteering they do. Now, for the first time, students will have the chance to be rewarded for their efforts with the Park City Student Service Award, thanks to the Park City-based McGuire Family Foundation.

The Park City Student Service Award aims to honor students in grades 9-12 who are committed to making a difference by volunteering their time to non-profit organizations in Park City or elsewhere. This award is not attached to grades or participation in a club — it is purely a volunteer service acknowledgement.

Award certificates will be given to students who meet the criteria of 50+ hours of community service from April 15, 2019, to April 15, 2020.

Seniors who meet the criteria and have completed 200+ hours of community service over the past four years will earn a service honor cord for graduation. The top senior honoree will receive $1,000 to donate to the nonprofit organization of his/her choice.

The deadline to apply is April 15. For more information contact Katie McGuire,kmcguire@mcguirefamilyfoundation.org, or Pepper Elliot at Park City High, pelliot@pcschools.us.

Full details and application available here in English.

Detalles completos y solicitud disponibles aquí en Español.

Career & Technical Education Celebrated This Month

For nearly a century, Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs across the United States have focused on equipping students with technical and life skills to help them become productive citizens. Now more than ever, CTE programs are needed to help ensure the strength of our workforce, global competitiveness, and the economic health of the nation.

Students and faculty in Park City School District are celebrating Career and Technical Education (CTE) Month, Feb. 1-29. The theme for 2020 is “Turn Your Dream into a Career.”

In conjunction with CTE Month, Feb. 27 is designated as Digital Learning Day. Every day is a digital learning day in Park City schools. Elementary students begin computer coding classes in elementary school. The PCCAPS program at Park City High, helps students develop 21st Century Skills through working on real-world projects for companies and organizations. Project types fall within the industry fields of engineering, coding, business solutions, health sciences, digital design and primary education. And this year, the dual-language immersion students began programming Ozobots for storytelling.

CTE Month provides schools with an opportunity to demonstrate how CTE prepares students for college and career. Students who participate in CTE obtain the academic knowledge, technical and workplace skills to compete in a global economy. Enter any of our CTE classrooms and you will immediately observe the rigor, relevance, and skills CTE courses offer our students

CTE courses have the potential to jumpstart a students’ career by preparing them for postsecondary education and training in high-skill, high-wage, and high-demand occupations. Currently, there are 58 CTE Career Pathways in the State of Utah.

For more information about CTE programs in Park City School District, contact a CTE teacher, academic counselor, or CTE Director Lyndsay Huntsman, lhuntsan@pcschools.us.

PCCAPS Adopts Industry Workflow Language to Help Students Aquire 21st Century Work Habits

By Rachel Pittard, PCCAPS Coordinator

Students need a tool for understanding good work habits for the 21st Century. In fact, students aren’t the only ones who need such a tool. Any organization with production goals and stakeholders needs a workflow structure to effectively convert ideas, desires and solutions into tangible products. 

At PCCAPS, Scrum has been adopted as that workflow system for students, instructors, mentors and business clients. Scrum solves many work habit problems, while at the same time, training students on industry workflow language they will inevitably encounter. Scrum is also a lucrative and in-demand project management career field most have never heard of. By implementing Scrum, students are able to assure clients of progress, roadblocks, and project deliverables.  

What is Scrum? Scrum is an agile project management system which was developed here in Utah by software industry leaders, Jeff Sutherland and Ken Schwabera. Scrum facilitates team collaboration on complex projects. Companies which have adopted Scrum or other Agile workflow systems include Spotify, Salesforce, Delta, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, Facebook, Adobe, Nokia, Siemens, BBC, CNN, General Electric, Bank of America, and many others. 

How do you teach students Scrum? Legos, of course. Supported by a classroom grant from Park City Education Foundation, Treasure Mountain Junior High teacher Ben Mueller piloted an innovative lego-based Scrum lesson for his ninth-grade Exploring Computer Science class during Fall 2019 semester. 

The goal is for student workgroups to collaborate on the construction of an entire town made of legos. They are given a backlog of specific requests from citizens of the town, such as a specific number of single family homes, a mansion for the mayor, trees, animals, retail shops, restaurants, hospital and transportation infrastructure. Students plan their work (sprints) in advance by estimating the time it will take to build each backlog item and by prioritizing the order of the tasks. Time allocated for each sprint is determined by the instructor. At the beginning of each sprint, students self-lead a stand up meeting in which each member answers three questions:

— What did I work on last time? 

— What do I plan on doing next? 

— What roadblocks, if any, are in my way of completing my tasks?

Each sprint is planned, which provides students with the opportunity to self discover and solve operational issues that may be delaying progress. In the end, students prioritize a complex set of tasks and collaborate to efficiently produce a single town using legos. 

On day one of the Spring 2020 semester, Mr. Mueller replicated the lesson for PCCAPS students at Park City High School. The Scrum workflow has been adopted as the operating system for student projects in order for them to experientially develop high-demand, 21st Century skills. 

About PCCAPS

A member of the national CAPS Network, and supported by Park City Education Foundation, the Park City Center for Advanced Professional Studies (PCCAPS) is an elective for Park City School District 11th and 12th graders. Student experience is guided by the principles of Project Based Learning (PBL), a teaching method in which students learn by actively engaging in real-world and personally meaningful projects.