PCSD Selected for Utah’s First Cohort in Personalized, Digital Learning

Park City School District has been selected to participate in the state’s first cohort for Leadership in Personalized and Digital Learning (LPDL).

The cohort offers a team of district leaders an opportunity for job-embedded professional learning to prepare the LEA for personalized learning. District leaders will participate in the program that features face-to-face opportunities to work with trained facilitators and other state leaders from the Utah Education Network and the Utah State Board of Education.

“This is a perfect fit for our district,” said Traci Evans, interim Associate Superintendent for Teaching and Learning. “It is exciting to be on the forefront of personalized, computer-based education.

Nine districts and three charter schools are part of the first cohort. The first meeting is Jan. 14 in Salt Lake City.

The purpose of the cohort is to build a deeper understanding of personalized learning, to assist participating districts in creating their Digital Teaching and Learning Plan, and to learn about new collection tools to drive decisions for personalized learning.

‘Informance’ to Highlight Park City High’s DC2

Dance Company 2Park City High’s Dance Company II  (DC2) will present its annual “Informance,” an informal and informative performance that features their work of the past several months. Two shows are set for Jan. 15, at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m., in the Eccles Center’s Black Box Theater.

This year’s Informance presents the six universal human emotions through dance: happiness, sadness, fear, contempt, surprise, and anger. The 19 dancers will present 10 pieces, all embodying one of these six emotions.

“DC2 has worked together to create, choreograph, and perform their Informance in order to share their knowledge and love of the art with friends, family, peers, and the community,” says Ashley Mott, DC2 and Dance Company director.

Mott said each student has been assigned a specific responsibility, from choreographing the dances, marketing the performance, creating videos to accompany their pieces, and establishing the show order.

“The dancers have worked tirelessly both inside and outside the classroom, finding time for a major production to their busy schedules,” she said.

There is no charge for the performance but donations will be accepted to help support the dance program.