Chinese Students in Park City as Part of Annual Exchange

Park City High School’s China Exchange program has existed for more than 25 years and is the longest standing high school student exchange for both the U.S. and China. Shirley Smith and Val Chin, both long-time Park City residents, initially established the program.

The high school’s sister school—Beijing #4 High School—one of the top high schools in China, hosts PCHS student ambassadors in China for two and a half weeks every other fall.  “Our students are greeted by their Chinese exchange counterpart and spend about a week in Beijing, including some of that time living in their counterpart’s home,” said David Knell, a Mandarin Chinese teacher at PCHS. “The group also travels around China before returning home.”

The Chinese student counterparts arrived today, Jan. 31, in Park City. They were introduced during a packed school welcome assembly. “Ten PCHS students reciprocate by hosting their Chinese counterpart in their homes,” Knell said. “They will spend time at PCHS, ski at Park City Mountain Resort a few days, usually attend a Utah Jazz game, and visit a number of local sites.  They will also  travel to Moab with the PCHS students before heading back to China with a short stop on the west coast.”

Knell said many of the students who have been part of the exchange program maintain friendships with their exchange group and their Chinese counterpart for years to come.

Districtwide Lockout Drill Planned for Feb. 1

The next districtwide lockout drill is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 1, at approximately 8:50 a.m. 

The district recently retained the services of the Tresit Group based in Logan, Utah. Tresit recommends effective and innovative security solutions for schools. Cole Smith from the Tresit Group will be at Park City School District Feb. 1 and critically analyze the safety protocols followed, particularly during the passing period between Treasure Mountain Junior High and Park City High School.

Smith is also helping the district develop the protocol for the modular safety and will be training administrators and staff on the protocol. He is  also reviewing the district’s visitor management and emergency response system, the front office vestibule designs, and proposed fencing at elementary schools.

“He has been extremely impressed with the trauma informed, resilience-focused practices the district has in place to prevent tragic situations on the front end,” said Superintendent Ember Conley.

Parents are asked to review the following reminders prior to Thursday’s lockout drill:

– Do NOT call schools or the district office. External phone calls will not be answered. Staff are assisting students.

– Parents, do NOT go to the schools. Please stay away from the area to allow law enforcement to handle the situation.

– Watch for a text from PCSD Chat alerting you when law enforcement has lifted the lockout.

– If you are in one of the schools during the lockout, our Standard Response Protocol is posted in every room, both in English and in Spanish, and a smaller version of the SRP is available at the front office, both in English and in Spanish.

– The Emergency Update section of the Newsroom will be updated throughout the drill as information becomes available.

PCHS Band Department Receives Multiple Honors and Awards

The Park City High School Band Department received some great news this week, including honors from the Utah Bandmasters Association, the Utah Music Educators Association, the Honor Orchestra of America, and the Utah All-State Jazz Band.

Jazz Educator of the Year: Chris Taylor, Director of Band, has been named Utah Bandmasters Association’s Jazz Educator of the Year. This is the second time in four years he has received this honor. To earn this award, Taylor’s jazz groups demonstrated excellence of the highest degree in the 2016-17 school year. He is one of four educators in the state to receive this award this year, and is the only teacher not from a 5A or 6A high school to receive the award. Taylor will receive his award and recognition at the upcoming Utah Bandmasters Association Conference. In addition to the JV and Varsity Jazz Ensembles, Taylor also directs the Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band.

Administrator of the Year: Former PCHS principal Bob O’Connor has been named as Administrator of the Year by the Utah Music Educator’s Association. This award was based on nominations earlier this school year, well before O’Connor took a leave of absence from Park City High. His nomination and award is based on his years of continuous support of the Park City High and Treasure Mountain Junior High music programs. “Bob is an advocate for music in every way,” said Bret Hughes, Director of Percussion. “He found a way to be at many school concerts, always came  to wish our students good luck prior to competitions, and was present in New Orleans when the Advanced Percussion Ensemble performed in front of 6,000 people at the National School Boards Conference. He was also on the curb of Kalakaua Ave one year ago when the Marching Band represented Utah in the 75th Anniversary Pearl Harbor Parade. The PCHS Music Department will be accepting the award in his honor at the upcoming Utah Music Educators Annual Conference.

Honor Orchestra of America: Michael Barski, a senior at PCHS, has been selected as a trombone player in the Honor Orchestra of America. This is a national honor group selected completely by blind audition. Barski is one of three trombone players in the country selected to perform with this ensemble. He will travel to Indianapolis, Indiana, in March to represent PCHS and PCSD in the Music for All National Festival where the orchestra performs two joint concerts with the Indianapolis Philharmonic.

All-State Jazz Band: Jonas Peterson, a junior who plays tenor saxophone, and Dylan Wolfe, a senior who plays bass trombone, have been selected to represent the high school in the Utah All-State Jazz Band. The band is an honor group representing all UHSAA classifications of schools based solely on audition. These two represent two of only four students selected from 1A-4A high schools. They will be among the 19 best jazz musicians in the state next week when they perform at the closing concert of the Utah Music Educator’s Annual Conference in St. George.

All-State Band: The Utah Music Educators Association annually recognizes the top 120 band students in Utah by naming them to the AllState Band (some of them also get assigned to perform as part of the All-State Orchestra). The following students from Park City High School performed at the All-State Gala on Jan. 20 at Abravanel  Hall in Salt Lake City: Marco Zanetti, E-flat clarinet; Bailey Landis, bass clarinet; Michael Barski and Nathan Wales, trombone; Connor Ball, euphonium; Jordan Fajardo-Bird and Joe Dinger, percussion. These seven students from PCHS represent more than 30 percent of the students selected from all of the 1A-4A high schools in Utah.

75th Anniversary of Allied D-Day Invasion in France: Additionally, the  Marching Band has been selected to perform in Normandy, France, in 2019 for the June 6 parade marking the 75th Anniversary of the Allied D-Day Invasion to liberate France.

 

After-school Violin Programs Combine STEM with the Arts

Anna Stampfli moved to Park City six months ago with her husband, four children, and two dogs. “I wanted to expand my business to the west coast and Park City afforded us the lifestyle change and location we wanted for our family.”

A former high school and junior high math teacher for more than a decade, she has seen her share of students who are uninspired to learn. Stampfli, an accomplished violinist, thought she should try bringing her musical talent into the classroom. And it worked.

She founded Arts Youth Empowerment, an organization that was structured to support the integration of comprehensive arts education for schools, inclusive of both performing and visual arts, in addition to providing after school arts programming to supplement existing curriculum. The vision and mission of the program is to support and create a strong connection for the students between the core subjects and the arts.  Now a Park City resident, she wanted to bring that same program to schools here.

After-school violin programs recently started at Parley’s Park and Trailside Elementary Schools. She calls them “integrated youth learning orchestras.”

Students initially focus on the violin, learning the fundamentals of playing a stringed instrument and developing a close connection with their core subjects. They are grouped into three teaching groups: Kindergarten and first grade, second and third grade, and fourth and fifth grade. Each after-school program meets weekly for 60 minutes. Her ninth-grade daughter is helping with the classes.

Each school will have a performance for parents, will perform as a district ensemble at Brigham Young University, and will appear with the Park City Children’s Choir.

Some 150 to 175 students are taking advantage of the after-school program at the two schools. Arts Youth Empowerment provides the violins and rents them to the families for a nominal fee. Some of the violins broke during her recent move to Park City and Stampfli said the second and third-grades will do a STEAM project to repair some of them.

“My mission and vision is to provide inspiring education for all children.” she said. “We are teaching the students there is a correlation between the violin and math.” She is developing projects with both schools related to STEAM areas of study. She is donating all supplies for STEAM projects.

“This program will help supplement Park City School Districts already outstanding curriculum and further establish it as one of the greatest educational systems in the nation,”  she said.

“The Park City After-school Program is extremely fortunate to partner with the new-to-town Arts Youth Empowerment and the Park City School District PTO/PTAs to offer a violin program to all of our students,” said Todd Klarich, director of Community Education for PCSD. “I have had the opportunity to witness the first few classes and the students could not be more excited. This partnership is the beginning of a wonderful opportunity that will empower the children of our community with the gift of music that will last a lifetime.”

A $5,000 grant to support the program at Trailside was provided by the Park City Education Foundation. “We have held this $5,000 for several years, as the donor wanted it to go to a violin program, specifically,” said PCEF Executive Director Abby McNulty. “As a major partner to the district for the After-school program, we are thrilled to help add this opportunity to the curriculum.”

Stampfli is anxious to implement the program at Jeremy Ranch and McPolin Elementary Schools once there is more funding, and the district is excited to see the positive change initiated through this year’s pilot programs.

Board Meeting Summary

Jan. 23, 2018 | Work Session

Superintendent Search

Darline Robles and Carmella Franco from the firm of HYA Executive Search met with the board to define the search process for a new superintendent. They presented the following calendar:

–Feb. 5-6: Individual interviews with board members; focus groups conducted during the day; community meeting conducted in both English and Spanish

–Feb. 9-16: Online survey in both English and Spanish

–Feb. 27: Leadership profile presented to Board

–April 17: Interviews and final stages of search; candidates presented to board

–April 27-28: Initial interviews with 5-7 candidates (selected by search committee)

–May 5-6: Semi-finalists’ interviews with board

–May 6: Board identifies preferred candidate

–TBD: Board members conduct site visit and extensive background check

–TBD: Public announcement of new superintendent

The online survey will collect information from internal and external stakeholders about what they consider to be the most important strengths and characteristics of a superintendent. Feb. 5-6 Robles and Franco will conduct a series of interviews and focus groups with stakeholders. Based on the survey results and the information gathered during interviews and focus groups, a leadership profile will be created by HYA and presented to the board. A national recruitment process will take 4-6 weeks (through March 31).

The board will form a 12-member search committee, comprised of parents and staff. Those interested in serving on the committee will be asked to apply. Once the committee is selected, it will interview candidates and present 5-7 candidates to the board. Initial interviews with the board will be April 27-28, followed by semi-finalist interviews with the Board May 5-6. The board will make its selection by the end of the day on May 6.  A public announcement will be made following a site visit and extensive background check.

NOTE: Robles is the the former superintendent of Los Angeles County Office of Education, and is currently a professor in the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California. She is also the former Superintendent of Schools for the Salt Lake School District. Franco spent 36 years in public education and retired as Superintendent of Schools of Whittier School District in California. She currently serves as Director of the Association of California School Administrators Superintendents’ Academy in Whittier.

Board Training

With new member Erin Grady joining the board Feb. 5, board members discussed possible trainings such as becoming a more cohesive board and governance for elected officials. The board plans to ask the Utah School Boards Association to conduct a refresher training during an upcoming work session. Board member Petra Butler said the board needs to hold itself accountable. She said it took courage for the Superintendent to come forward at the last meeting and tell the board it needed additional training. “We also need to work on respect with one another, having respect within the district, and becoming active listeners,” she said.

Upcoming Board Conferences

Butler and Board Vice President JJ Ehlers plan to attend the National School Boards Association  Conference April 7-9 in San Antonio, Texas. In the future, board members expressed interest in attending the annual Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) National Conference.

PCLA Principal Named Interim Director of Special Education

Tracy Sjostrom, principal at Park City  Learning Academy, has been named interim Special Education Director for Park City School District.

Sjostrom has a master’s degree in Education, Leadership and Policy from the University of Utah and holds a bachelor’s from UCLA. She has taught special education and at-risk students and has served as a specialist, assistant principal and principal in Utah and Washington.

Tracy is an outstanding administrator with a deep understanding of special education. She brings a unique skill set with her experience working with students with unique emotional and behavioral needs,” said Ben Belnap, Associate Superintendent of Student Wellness. “Tracy’s experience and expertise will continue us down the path of enhancing our processes and systemic approaches to supporting our students and their families.

 

 

Board Meeting Summary

Jan. 16, 2018 — Regular Session

National Board Certified Teachers

The following educators were recognized for completing their National Board Certification: Liis Rametta, a fifth-grade dual immersion (English) teacher at Jeremy Ranch Elementary; Matt Nagel, English teacher at Park City High; Steve Cuttitta, English teacher at Park City High. National Board Certification develops, retains, and recognizes accomplished teachers and generates ongoing improvement in schools nationwide. It is the most respected professional certification available in K-12 education. Issued by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the certification is a rigorous process that takes one to three years to complete. 

PCEA Report

Ben Kahn, representing the Park City Education Association said pre-negotiations are off to a great start. PCEA is looking forward to discussing meaningful professional development with Superintendent Ember Conley and Kathleen Einhorn. Kahn also asked the hiring committee for future Cabinet members involve all stakeholders, especially teachers.

PCCEA

Colleen Mutcher, representing the Park City Classified Education Association, invited the board to participate in “Bring a Board Member to Work” initiative. District department employees are willing to spend 30 minutes to an hour showing the board their department responsibilities. She also said the Utah School Employee Association Delegate Conference will be held in Park City in April.

Board Member Reports

Julie Eihausen expressed concern over the process to appoint a new board member. She said a sitting board member has a long-term friendship with the new board member and it was not disclosed by the board member or the applicant. She believes that relationship should have been disclosed in light of the 3-2 vote. Eihausen said she believes in full transparency and the process was not transparent.

–JJ Ehlers attended a PCCAPS meeting where she learned they need funding for noise reduction in their facility. The program also wants to rearrange its space so it can be used for other classes.

–Petra Butler reported that she is part of a new transportation committee that is working with all city stakeholders to study various modes of transportation.

Park City Education Foundation Report

PCEF board member Jodey Fey and Program Director Kara Cody reported the foundation funded 23 teacher grants in the amount of $75,200. Fey said this was the year of “all things tech.” Some examples of grants include: Makerspace expansion, 3D printer, modular circuits for electronics, recording equipment, virtual reality equipment, and hands-on STEM.

Communications Report

Melinda Colton, Director of Communication, reported the district’s recent national honors:

–USA Today named Park City High as the best public high school in Utah.

–Business Insider ranked Park City as the best school district in Utah.

–Dr. Conley was featured in the American School Board Journal as part of an opioid article that discussed the impact opioids have on schools.

Eric Equival, Latino Community Relations specialist, provided a monthly report on the Latino outreach efforts at the District and school levels.

Superintendent’s Report

–Superintendent Conley shared a TEDx Youth talk, “A Community Divided,” given by Park City High student Skylar Jackenthal about respect, kindness, and compassion. Jackenthal argues that Park City has lost its amazingness. Watch the TEDx Youth talk here. “You had the courage to speak out,” Dr. Conley said. “So many times we do not share our stories that can help others. Thank you for challenging us for what we can do to change.” The Superintendent thanked Teri Orr for bringing this program to Park City High and expressed appreciation to the Park City Institute for providing remarkable training for students.

–Dr. Conley also recognized board member Eihausen and thanked her for her service on the board. This was Eihausen’s last meeting.

Master Planning Follow-up

Business Administrator Todd Hauber told the board he is working on the request for proposal for a master planning consultant. He said there are different types of master planning and the district wants to be very specific in its need.

Budget Discussion

The Board had some questions regarding the FY19 preliminary budget and the district narrative. Hauber reminded the board it is only looking at budget items for FY19. The Board will address more details of the budget at its next Work Session.

Policy Retired

The board approved retiring Policy 7000: Employee Involvement with Non-School Travel.

Policy Discussed

The board discussed Policy 9045: Student Travel, and a request received from the high school music teachers to allow eighth-grade students to travel to Normandy this summer with the high school band. The eighth graders will only be 10 days short of becoming official 9th graders.

The board voted to send the policy back to the Policy Committee to include an exemption process.

Policies to Post

The board approved posting the following revised policies:

–Policy 7005: Employee Ethics

–Policy 2010: Eligibility and Qualifications of a Board Member

–Policy 7050: Administrative Sabbatical Leave

–Policy 10010: Student Enrollment

Policies Approved

The board adopted the following revised policies:

–Policy 4005: Purchasing Policy

–Policy 7020: Drug Testing of Drivers of District Vehicles

–Policy 7025: Personnel Records

–Policy 7035: Scope of Employment and Use of Weapons

–Policy 7045: Benefit Status During Unpaid Leave

–Policy 7100: Professional Staff Transfers

The board tabled Policy 9025—Wellness Policy, until its next meeting. In the meantime, the Policy Committee will review the recess and nutrition suggestions made by parents.

Superintendent Search Update

The board has retained HYA Associates to conduct a national search for a new superintendent. HYA is one of the oldest and largest search firms, having assisted more than 1,000 school boards select leadership in school systems across the nation. Darline Robles with HYA Associates talked with the board via a conference call and presented an overview on how the firm conducts a superintendent search. Robles will meet with the board on Jan. 23 at noon.

Patron Comments

Superintendent Resignation

–Bari Nan Rothchild, a parent representing a group of community members, wants the board to ask Dr. Conley to rescind her resignation. She said Dr. Conley is an educator in the truest sense and has led the district during some of its darkest hours. She asked the board to find a way to keep her—keeping her would a avoid a costly search and a lengthy transition that will not benefit students.

–Sally Elliott, who has lived in Park City for 32 years and has served two terms on the Summit County Council, said this is the first time she has ever attended a school board meeting, but she came to express support for asking the Superintendent to stay. She said the district needs stable, competent leadership. She asked the board to consider having government official training to better understand their roles, which has been offered by the Park City Mayor and South Summit Council members. She urged the board to do all it can to retain Dr. Conley.

–Christina Miller, a parent representing several members of the community, said Dr. Conley’s resignation is a symptom of a much greater issue. Miller said she has spoken with parents, teachers, members of the Utah School Boards Association and Utah School Superintendents Association, business owners, and community leaders, and all want the board to consider asking Dr. Coney to stay. She said the district has a lot of issues on the table that need momentum moving forward. The time and money spent on a search for a new superintendent will take away time from students and teachers. She asked the board to take the Mayor’s and Summit County Council’s offer to facilitate more functional conversations with district leadership.

–Dr. John Hanrahand, a parent who has served on numerous district committees, expressed his respect for Superintendent Conley. He is convinced she has the best interests of students at heart. He believes she is the best Superintendent the district has had since he moved here in 1992. He encouraged the board to have meetings with the Superintendent to figure out a way to keep Dr. Conley.

–President Andrew Caplan: “From the board’s perspective, we are sad to see Dr. Conley go. We did not terminate Dr. Conley or ask for her resignation. When she resigned we respected her wishes and her resignation. No change is more important than the change in our Superintendent. This is not what we wanted to focus on. It will be a distraction to the district. The characterization that is out in the community that the district is a mess is unfair to the Board, Administration, and all employees in our district. We were recognized twice by national organizations this week, and have a Blue Ribbon School. That is a testament to the work Dr. Conley has done, as well as all our Administrators, teachers, and the board. Thank you for coming tonight and supporting Dr. Conley.”

–Superintendent Ember Conley: “The outpouring of the community has been extremely encouraging. The turnover on the Board has been very difficult and it has caused us to fumble along the way. Changing direction and executing the wishes of the board has been extremely difficult, both professionally and personally. With or without me, I am begging you on behalf of our district to have a mentor from  the city or county council. You asked me to do executive coaching, I’m asking you to do the same.”

McPolin Elementary Recess

–Stephanie Winzeler, a parent from McPolin Elementary, shared her concerns and ideas concerning its Wellness Policy. She urged the board to include recess standards as it updates its Wellness policy. She believes recess is not a privilege, but a necessary for students. She told

the board McPolin Elementary has eliminated one recess for fourth- and fifth-grade students and hopes the board will consider setting recess guidelines.

–Laura Rojas, a parent from McPolin Elementary, also expressed concern about the recess being taken away because of behavior issues. She said the time it takes to resolve recess issues with students takes away from instructional time. She said now is the time to work on behavior issues with the the fourth- and fifth-grade students before they move on to middle school. Mrs. Rojas said she understands the demands placed on the principals and staff, and parents have offered to volunteer at recess.

–David Peters, a parent from McPolin Elementary, realizes the board has a lot of issues it is dealing with, but also thinks it is important to look at any issue that has to do with the health of 8 -, 9-, and 10-year-old students. He believes it is extremely important for students to have recess. He asked the board to look at how parents can assist the school before the chemistry of a student’s day is altered.

EATS Park City

Jenae Ridge, Executive Director of EATS Park City, asked the board as it reviews its Wellness Policy to make the nutrition section more progressive.

Superintendent featured in American School Board Journal

Park City School District Superintendent Ember Conley is featured in the February issue of the “American School Board Journal” produced by the National School Boards Association. She was interviewed for the article, “Killer Epidemic: Schools Deal with the Repercussions of the Opioid Crisis.”

In the magazine, Dr. Conley discusses the deaths of two 13-year-old middle school students who fatally overdosed within days of one another in September 2016.  She quickly learned the “depths and breadth” of the opioid crisis in Park City and Summit County. “We listened to a career drug enforcement agent tell us that this epidemic is the worst drug crisis in the nation’s history,” she told the national publication.

The superintendent emphasized bringing students into the conversation following the deaths of the two eighth-grade students. The article states: “Many students mentioned that they’d only been taught to say no. Instead, they wanted to know the consequences of drug use. The district responded by revamping the drug abuse component of its life skills curriculum, emphasizing the impact of drugs on brain development. It began introducing these concepts to students starting in late fourth grade. The district also emphasized a culture that promotes a safe, healthy, and engaged environment for students and teachers. Programming around mindfulness and yoga have taken off in the elementary schools. There’s been added focus on nutrition and the importance on rest and rejuvenation. A teacher training initiative emphasizes focusing on students’ unique strengths. To help guide and coordinate its increased mental health outreach, wraparound support programs, staff training, and counseling efforts, the district created a new position: assistant superintendent of student wellness.”

“Utah has the highest suicide rate in the nation, the fourth highest opioid use,” Conley told Michelle Healy, associate editor of American School Board Journal who wrote the article. “Our students are coming to us with [an array] of issues. Being able to add additional staff, counseling, training, and conversation has been extremely important.”

Dr. Conley told the magazine that the school board put together a two- to three-year plan to fund the district’s new resources. It also supported the decision to stock all district schools—elementary, middle, and high—with naloxone, the opioid-overdose reversal drug often referred to by its brand name, Narcan. School nurses and first responder teams in each school have been trained in its use, she said.

The American School Board Journal is an award-winning monthly education magazine published by the National School Boards Association.

Park City Named Best School District in Utah

Park City School District has receive the honor of being named best school district in Utah by Business Insider.

“There are nearly 100,000  elementary, middle, and high schools in the U.S. The best districts are coveted, and a high-caliber school system can be a key factor when a family decides to relocate to one city over another,” the article states.

Niche, a company that researches and compiles information on schools, provides a ranking of school districts. Their ranking is based on a district’s strength of academics, health and safety, diversity, and the quality of teachers.

“We are incredibly honored,” said Superintendent Ember Conley. “This accolade is a reflection of the incredible teachers and staff who are advocates for our students. We also strive to be forward thinking in providing our students with the best possible education,” she said.

PCSD’s letter grades from Niche include:

Academics: A

Health & safety: A

Diversity: B-

Teachers: A+

Park City High Principal Shares He is Not Returning

Highly respected school leader Park City High School Principal Bob O’Connor shared Thursday, Jan. 11, that he will not be returning as principal at the high school in order to address health concerns.

Mr. O’Connor released the following statement to students, parents, and faculty: 

“I want to thank all of you so much for your concern and support over the past several weeks while I’ve been going through a series of screenings and tests to diagnose my health-related symptoms. My doctors have discovered evidence of a neuromuscular-degenerative disease that requires me to seek multiple care plans and treatments. It is in my best interest to take medical leave to fully explore treatment options. Due to the nature of my health issues I will not be able to return as Principal of Park City High School.

“I am proud of my 21 years of service in leadership roles in the Park City School District. My latest service as Principal for the past six years at Park City High School is reflected through the numerous accomplishments of the entire faculty and student body.

“The students at Park City High School offer me hope for a brighter world full of music, scientific discoveries, athleticism, diversity and environmental stewardship. Their love and enthusiasm are infectious, which is something I will cherish forever.”

Superintendent Ember Conley announced in November that Mr. O’Connor was taking leave. Kathleen Einhorn was named interim principal. Dr. Einhorn will serve as principal the remainder of the 2017-18 school year. 

“Mr. O’Connor is a highly respected educator and administrator. He is a role model for advocating for children and his staff.  His exemplary service as a leader in the district will be irreplaceable. He is a advocate and champion for students.”

The district will post the position this month and begin the search for a new high school principal. The district will screen applicants and interview in March with the replacement announced later that month. A hiring committee will follow district policy with a balanced team of teachers, parents, administrators, and board members.

Mr. O’Connor was hired by Park City School District in 1997 and has served as principal at PCHS since August 2012. Prior to that he was an assistant principal at PCHS and a principal at Treasure Mountain Junior High School.