A Letter from the Board of Education

pcsd logo

In regards to current community discussions involving Park City School District, the Board of Education wants to remind the community of the mission and vision for the district created in 2017 through community input and shared collective values and aspirations of our learning organization.

Our mission is to inspire and support all students equitably to achieve their academic and social potential. Our vision is student-centered with a focus and emphasis on the whole child — our students are safe, supported, engaged and healthy.

When we say “all students” we literally mean all students regardless of their socioeconomic status, their religious beliefs, their immigration status, their sexual preference, their learning ability or any other factors with which students may identify.

There has been recent discussion around a professional development module that was presented to teachers at Trailside Elementary in August by the equity officer from the Utah State Board of Education. The program, called “Welcoming Schools,” focuses on anti-bullying and was in a direct response to two forces: specific bullying that our teachers witnessed at that school and state law that mandates anti-bullying programs be adopted at all districts. Given this program is state approved and administered, we did not anticipate the criticism that we have received via anonymous letters, social media posts and threats of legal action.

We welcome feedback from parents and community members but ask that this discourse remain civil and that threats of legal action or harassment against specific members of district staff stop immediately. PCSD employees are our friends, neighbors and community members and deserve our respect regardless of differences in opinions.

We would also like to address recent criticism and harassment around repairs being done to the district-owned property where the Superintendent and her family live. In response to the community’s desire for the superintendent to live within the district boundaries, the board purchased a residence in Jeremy Ranch. The board decided that purchasing a property was a more efficient use of resources than providing a rent stipend that we would have no equity benefit.

Given the superintendent’s residence is 25 years old, repairs were included in the budget for much-needed safety and structural improvements. So far a total budget allocation of $67,000 has been spent.

Unfortunately, we are now seeing complaints on social media and in the press that both mischaracterize the maintenance being done and directly attacking the superintendent. These repairs are benefiting the same neighbors who are complaining about the work being done.

Please remember that online abuse, including inciting people to go to the house and threaten and harass the superintendent, is not only potentially illegal but also morally wrong. It feels inappropriate in this case, where a parent of the family residing in this residence is working for the children of this community.

Most troubling is that this district property was attacked last week when a rock was thrown through one of the windows in response to the vitriol that certain “neighbors” have been posting on a popular social media site. We are embarrassed and ashamed that this is how some members of the neighborhood have welcomed the superintendent and her family to Park City.

We value dissenting opinion and comments at all times, but we will not tolerate verbal, written or physical harassment of district employees. This behavior is not only dangerous and illegal but sets a terrible example for the children of Park City.

We believe these actions and words belong to a vocal minority and we appeal to the rest of the community, families and individuals who make up the Park City community that we know and love. Please stand up for what is right and push back against those who feel that threats, intimidation and physical violence are better avenues of expression than traditional conversation and discourse.

— Park City Board of Education

Andrew Caplan, President

Erin Grady, Vice President

Wendy Crossland

Kara Hendrickson

Anne Peters

School counselors introduce inaugural issue of ‘Counselor Connection’

Beginning this month, Park City High counselors, along with counselors throughout the school district, invite parents/guardians, educators, and community members to review the new “Counselor Connection: Parenting Tips for Today.” This month’s issue focuses on vaping.

Park City School District works with students and families to minimize/eliminate the use of e-cigarettes in or around school campuses. If devices are found, cartridges are tested to be certain there are not illegal substances such as THC in the device.

Devices, as they are not permitted on site, are confiscated. We work with students and families on both educational intervention and age appropriate consequences.

Please contact your school administrators if you have additional questions about vaping or the use of e-cigarettes on campus. 

Read the full newsletter here: English | Espanol

Information Regarding Use of Welcoming Schools Program and Threatened Litigation / Informacion sobre el uso del programa de dievenida en las esquelas y la amenaza de litigio

As some in our community know, Park City School District has recently received a demand letter from Solon Law and the Pacific Justice Institute regarding the use of the Welcoming Schools program at Trailside Elementary School. This professional learning program provides educators with information on how to address bullying situations or exclusionary behaviors with our students.

While the District’s attorneys will be substantively responding to that communication in due course, we want to inform the community regarding our perspective on the issues and attempt to correct some of the misinformation that appears to be floating around in the community.

First and foremost, the mission of Park City School District is to inspire and support ALL students EQUITABLY to achieve their academic and social potential. All Park City schools are working toward creating an inclusive environment for all families. Positive school culture is essential in welcoming all students and families to participate and feel a sense of belonging within the schools.

The District as a whole is also working to comply with applicable Utah statutes and Utah State Board of Education administrative rules regarding bullying policies and staff training. Specifically, Rule 277-613-1 requires school districts to “develop, update, and implement bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, retaliation, and abusive conduct policies at the school district and school level.” Similarly, R277-613-4 requires school districts to provide training that includes information on various types of bullying, including “bullying, cyber-bullying, hazing, and retaliation based upon the students’ or employees’ actual or perceived characteristics, including race, color, national origin, sex, disability, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, or other physical or mental attributes or conformance or failure to conform with stereotypes.”

It is our belief that the use of the Welcoming Schools program for professional development is consistent with this mandate. Trailside Elementary teachers are being trained this year in a way that prepares them to have the appropriate tools to provide a safe, optimal and equitable learning environment for their students. So far this year, teachers have received 3 hours of professional development training using the Welcoming Schools program. That training was delivered by Holly Bell, Equity and Advocacy Specialist for the Utah State Board of Education. The professional development module was entitled “Embracing Family Diversity” and the goal is to equip educators with the tools to be able to answer questions from students and families about the importance of welcoming all families in our diverse school community. Written training materials provided to our staff in connection with that module are available for review. 

We would be in grave violation of our duties as public educators and school leaders if we did not strive to prepare our teachers to teach not only the academic portion of the curriculum, but also to address and support the social and emotional growth and development of our diverse student body while at school. In choosing to send your child to Park City School District, you should expect nothing less of us. The Welcoming Schools program is only one small piece of this huge responsibility that we share with parents.

When questions started to be raised about the program, and even before the receipt of the demand letter at issue, we committed to looking at the implementation of the program to see if we could assuage the concerns that have been brought to our attention. While we do not believe that the program teaches sex education in any way that violates state law or otherwise violates the rights of members of our community, we will further examine this issue moving forward.

Even though the arguments set forth in the demand letter may be extremely emotional to many members of our community on both sides of the issue, we hope and expect that patrons and other community members will model the values we try to instill in our students: respect, honesty, and integrity in their communications. We also want to remind the community that pursuant to the same state law and District policy that requires us to implement anti-bullying policies and training, our employees may not be subjected to, and we will not tolerate, “abusive conduct”, meaning verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct that a reasonable person would determine is intended to cause intimidation, humiliation or unwarranted distress.  

Finally, we hope that our community will appreciate that the primary obligation of our teachers is to focus on their important work within the classroom. This means that community members who wish to make their opinions known regarding these issues should address their concerns not to classroom teachers or individual school counselors and administrators, but to the Superintendent and elected members of the Board of Education. Ultimately, the Board of Education, in consultation with the Superintendent, Cabinet, and legal counsel, will decide on the appropriate response to the demands that have been made. Thank you for reading and for your continued involvement in the education of our community’s most precious resource, our children.


Como algunas personas de nuestra comunidad conocen, el Distrito Escolar de Park City ha recibido recientemente una carta de demanda de las oficinas de Solon Law y del Pacific Justice Institute con respecto al uso del programa Escolar de Bienvenida en la Escuela Elemental Trailside. Este programa de aprendizaje profesional proporciona a los educadores información sobre cómo abordar situaciones de acoso escolar o comportamientos excluyentes con nuestros estudiantes.

Si bien los abogados del Distrito responderán sustancialmente a esa comunicación a su debido tiempo, queremos informar a la comunidad sobre nuestra perspectiva sobre los problemas e intentar corregir parte de la información errónea que parece estar girando en la comunidad.

Primero y lo más importante, la misión del Distrito Escolar de Park City es inspirar y apoyar a TODOS los estudiantes de manera EQUITATIVA para que alcancen su potencial académico y social. Todas las escuelas de Park City están trabajando para crear un ambiente inclusivo para todas las familias. Una cultura escolar positiva es esencial para dar la bienvenida a todos los estudiantes y familias y que estos participen y tengan un sentido de pertenencia en las escuelas.

El Distrito en su conjunto esta también trabajando para cumplir con los estatutos de Utah que son aplicables y las reglas administrativas de la Junta de Educación del Estado de Utah con respecto a las políticas de intimidación y la capacitación del personal.  Específicamente, la Regla 277-613-1 requiere que los distritos escolares “desarrollen, actualicen e implementen políticas de intimidación, hostigamiento cibernético, burlas, represalias y conductas abusivas a nivel del distrito escolar y de las escuelas.” Del mismo modo, la R277-613-4 requiere que los distritos escolares brinden capacitación que incluya información sobre varios tipos de acoso escolar, incluyendo “hostigamiento escolar, acoso cibernético, burlas y represalias basadas en las características reales o percibidas de los estudiantes o empleados, incluyendo raza, color, nacionalidad de origen, sexo, discapacidad, religión, identidad de género, orientación sexual,  atributos físicos o mentales, o conformidad o inconformidad de los estereotipos.”

Creemos que el uso del programa Escolar de Bienvenida para el desarrollo profesional es consistente con este mandato. Los maestros de la Escuela Primaria Trailside están siendo entrenados este año de una manera que los prepara para tener las herramientas apropiadas para proporcionar un ambiente de aprendizaje seguro, óptimo y equitativo para sus estudiantes. En lo que va del año, los maestros han recibido 1.5 horas de capacitación en desarrollo profesional utilizando el programa Escolar de Bienvenida. Esa capacitación fue impartida por Holly Bell, especialista en equidad y defensa de la Junta de Educación del Estado de Utah. El módulo de desarrollo profesional se tituló “Abrazando la diversidad familiar” y el objetivo es equipar a los educadores con las herramientas para que puedan responder preguntas de los estudiantes y las familias sobre la importancia de dar la bienvenida a todas las familias en nuestra diversa comunidad escolar. Los materiales de capacitación escritos, proporcionados a nuestro personal en relación con ese modulo, están disponibles para su revisión.  

Estaríamos en grave violación de nuestros deberes como educadores públicos y líderes escolares si no nos esforzaríamos por preparar a nuestros maestros para enseñar no solo la parte académica del plan de estudios, sino también para abordar y apoyar el crecimiento y desarrollo social y emocional de nuestro diverso alumnado en las escuelas. Al elegir enviar a su hijo (a) al Distrito Escolar de Park City, es lo menos que debe esperar de nosotros. El programa de Bienvenida de Escuelas es solo una pequeña parte de esta enorme responsabilidad que compartimos con los padres.

A pesar de que los argumentos establecidos en la carta de demanda pueden ser extremadamente emotivos para muchos miembros de nuestra comunidad en ambos lados del problema, esperamos que los involucrados y otros miembros de la comunidad modelen los valores que intentamos inculcar en nuestros estudiantes: respeto, honestidad e integridad en sus comunicaciones. También queremos recordarle a la comunidad que, de conformidad con la misma ley estatal y la política del Distrito que nos obliga a implementar políticas y capacitación contra el acoso escolar, nuestros empleados no pueden ser sometidos, y no toleraremos, “conducta abusiva”, es decir, verbal, no verbal, o física hacia ellos, que una persona razonable determinaría que tiene la intención de causar intimidación, humillación o angustia injustificada.   Finalmente, esperamos que nuestra comunidad aprecie que la obligación principal de nuestros maestros es enfocarse en su importante trabajo dentro de las aulas. Esto significa que los miembros de la comunidad que deseen dar a conocer sus opiniones con respecto a estos temas deben dirigir sus inquietudes no a los maestros de la clase, o a consejeros o administradores individualmente, sino a la Superintendente y a los miembros elegidos de la Junta de Educación. Finalmente, la Junta de Educación, en consulta con la Superintendente, el Gabinete y el asesor legal, decidirá la respuesta adecuada a las demandas que se han formulado. Gracias por leer esta carta y por su continua participación en la educación del recurso más apreciado de nuestra comunidad, nuestros niños.

Board Meeting Summary | Oct. 15, 2019

PCEA Report

Amanda Lawing, co-president of the Park City Education Association, said the association is continuing its focus on student success, safety, and transparency. PCEA members have been invited to share their suggestions to improve teacher recruitment and retention. 

Student Report

Mimi Luna, the student representative on the board, reported that Homecoming was successful, especially the school’s first Homecoming parade. The Miners final region football game is Oct. 16. Prior to the game, students are invited to a tailgate party that will feature food made by PCHS culinary arts students. 

Chief Operations Officer Report

Mike Tanner said the Security/Safety Committee is discussing open campus security between the Park City High and Treasure Mountain Junior High. The committee will also be reviewing the district’s current emergency response protocol.

– The front entrance vestibule is complete at Treasure Mountain and visitors will now be required to check-in with an ID.

– Tanner is participating in the Utah Schools Critical Commission, created through the Utah Division of Risk Management, that is working to create a uniform emergency protocol across all school districts. 

– There is still a need for substitute bus drivers. The district is using commercial drivers to support PCHS athletic trips. Four new buses will be in service by the end of the month, paid in part through an $80,000 EPA grant. 

– John Hopkins, the new director of Child Nutrition Services, was introduced to the board.

Superintendent Report

Superintendent Jill Gildea said staff, educators, and administrators are focused on doing “whatever it takes” to support each and every learner in Park City schools.  As a culture of excellence is fostered, Dr. Gildea said the district is focused on improving student achievement through: 1) strengthening school-based factors, such as teacher professional development, use of evidence-based practices within classrooms, and equitable allocation of resources; 2) bolstering student resilience which is a key aspect of success through social, emotional learning programs, equity in services, and providing a safe and secure school environment; and 3) building community alliances to support family and community engagement, offering a variety of extracurriculars, and providing school-based social services in partnership with our community. 

Community Social Equity Update

Diego Zegarra, Social Equity Director, presented an overview of the Community Social Equity Strategic Plan. The most important areas of focus include affordable housing, education, and inclusion. The full report can be viewed here

Oct. 1 Enrollment

Business Administrator Todd Hauber reported the Oct. 1 enrollment is 4,765, a decrease of 15 students from last year. 

Master Planning Update

Dr. Gildea shared community feedback about possible master planning priorities. See presentation here

New Policy for Posting

Policy 1001: Code of Conduct

Policy Approved

 Policy 10045: Attendance 

Public Comment 

Shannon Schemmer expressed concern with teachers learning to use PowerTeacher Pro version of the gradebook program. She believes when too many variables at one time are changed, it puts additional stress on students, teachers, and parents. She also questioned the decision to end the quarter the same week as Fall Break.

Resumen de la Reunión de la Junta Directiva  | 10-15-19

Reporte de PCEA

Amanda Lawing, co-presidente de la Asociación de Educación de Park City (PEA), dijo que la asociación continúa centrándose en el éxito, la seguridad y la transparencia de los estudiantes. Los miembros de PCEA han sido invitados a compartir sus sugerencias para mejorar el reclutamiento y retención de maestros.

Informe del Estudiante

Mimi Luna, la representante estudiantil de la junta, informó que el baile de Bienvenida (Homecoming) fue exitoso, incluyendo el primer desfile de Homecoming y el invitar a estudiantes del primer año al baile. El juego final de football de la región de los Miners es el 16 de octubre e incluirá una fiesta previa con comida hecha por estudiantes de artes culinarias del Park City High School (PCHS).

Reporte del Director de Operaciones

Mike Tanner dijo que el Comité de Seguridad está discutiendo la seguridad del campo entre Park City High School y Treasure Mountain Junior High. El comité estará también revisando el protocolo actual del distrito sobre respuestas de emergencias.

– El vestíbulo de la entrada principal de Treasure Mountain está terminada y ahora se pedirá a los visitantes que se registren con una identificación (ID).

– Tanner está participando en la Comisión Escolar Critica, creada a través de la División de Administración de Riesgos de Utah, que está trabajando para crear un protocolo de emergencia uniforme en todos los distritos escolares.

– Todavía hay necesidad de conductores substitutos. El distrito está ofreciendo sus conductores para apoyar los viajes deportivos del Park City High school. Cuatro nuevos buses estarán en servicio a finales de mes, pagados en parte a través de una subvención de $80,000 de EPA. 

– John Hopkins, el nuevo director de Servicios de Nutrición Infantil, fue presentado a la junta.

Reporte de la Superintendente

La Superintendente Jill Gildea dijo que los empleados, educadores, y administradores están enfocados en hacer “lo que sea necesario” para apoyar a todos y cada uno de los interesados en las escuelas de Park City. A medida que fomentamos una cultura de excelencia, la Dra. Gildea dijo que el distrito está enfocado en mejorar el rendimiento de los estudiantes a través de: 1) reforzando factores protectores basados en la escuela, como el desarrollo profesional de los docentes, el uso de prácticas basadas en eventos en las aulas, y la asignación equitativa de recursos; 2) reforzando la capacidad de recuperación de los estudiantes, lo es un aspecto clave del éxito, a través de programas de aprendizaje social y emocional, equidad en los servicio, y proporcionando un ambiente escolar seguro y estable; y 3) construyendo alianzas comunitarias para apoyar la participación familiar y comunitaria, ofreciendo una variedad de actividades extracurriculares, y brindando servicios sociales basados en la escuela en asociación con nuestra comunidad.

Actualización de la Equidad Social Comunitaria

Diego Zegarra, Director de Equidad Social, presentó una visión general del plan estratégico de equidad social de la comunidad. Las áreas más importantes de enfoque incluyen vivienda asequible, educación e inclusión. El reporte completo puede ser visto aquí.

Octubre 1 Inscripción

El Administrador de Negocios Todd Hauber compartió los datos de inscripción de octubre 1: 4,765 estudiantes, una disminución de 15 estudiantes comparado con el último año.

           Distrito Escolar de Park City octubre 1 Inscripción por Escuela

           Inscripción Total                    Actual                    Proyectada         Actual

                                                          Oct 1, 18                  Oct 1, 19             10/1/2019

           Parley’s Park                                 522                           526                      547

            McPolin                                        380                            382                      388

           Jeremy Ranch                               546                           556                      555

           Traiside                                          461                           469                      427

           Ecker Hill                                       805                            768                     773

           Treasure Mountain                     813                            806                     784 

           High School                                1,253                         1,287                  1,291

                                       Total:              4,780                          4,794                 4,765

            Cambio                                         (37)                                 14                     (15)

            Cambio Porcentual                    -8%                            0.3%                 -0.3%  

Actualización de la Planificación Maestra

La Dra. Gildea compartió comentarios de la comunidad sobre posibles prioridades del plan maestro. Ver la presentación aquí.

Nueva Reglament a Publicarse

Regulación 1001: Código de Conducta

Reglamento Aprobada

Regulación 10045: Asistencia

Comentarios del Publico

Shannon Schemmer expresó su preocupación con los maestros que están aprendiendo a usar la versión del libro de calificaciones del programa Power Teacher Pro. Ella cree que cambiar demasiadas variables a la vez añade mucho estrés adicional en los estudiantes, maestros, y padres. Ella también cuestionó la decisión de terminar el trimestre la misma semana del receso de otoño.

Business Leaders Invited to Tour PCCAPS Program Nov. 1

Park City High School’s corporate solutions lab, the Center for Advanced Professional Studies (PCCAPS), invites area business leaders to attend an open house Nov. 1 to see if PCCAPS students can help them solve a business problem.

Set from 11 a.m. to noon at PCHS, the open house is an opportunity to 1) tour the CAPS space, 2) experience the students in action, and 3) create a custom project to help solve a business problem. Those interested in attending are asked to RSVP to rpittard@pcschools.us by Wednesday, Oct. 30.

Park City High School’s new PCCAPS Project Coordinator Rachel Pittard is thrilled to facilitate new partner projects for the students. “What differentiates this new generation of PCCAPS students is the leap from project members to project drivers. Their instructors and mentors teach Agile management techniques throughout the project life cycle; from discovery to delivery,” said Pittard. “Ready or not, these students are coming to the table with outstanding client communication and project management skills. I have no doubt these young people will be running the show in their future roles.”

Pittard encourages business leaders to see how other companies and organizations have benefitted from PCCAPS services. Most importantly, she said visitors will leave inspired.

Lyndsay Huntsman, director of PCCAPS, said the PCCAPS space is intended to provide a personalized, student-centered learning environment.  “We want students to develop an entrepreneurial mindset by taking risks, failing forward, and making pivots along the way,” she said.

“PCCAPS provides an experiential learning opportunity for students to discover where their passion and skill sets intersect.  I’m fortunate to be surrounded by an amazing team — our instructors and mentors serve as the backbone of support for the projects,” Huntsman said.

Now in its 7th year, PCCAPS has assisted more than 250 companies and continues to expand its partnership with organizations across the State of Utah.

Since its inception, the Park City community and PCCAPS students have mutually benefited from solving real problems in the areas of space design, software development, marketing, business strategy, injury prevention, nutrition education, social media optimization, product development, prototyping, brand development & customer communication. Students earn credit in the program while participating in experiential learning & making career contacts. Partner organizations gain creative, customized assistance on problems which disrupt their goals and objectives. 

Superintendent Signs ‘Call to Action’ Prioritizing Student Attendance

In honor of Attendance Awareness Month in September Park City School District Superintendent Jill Gildea has joined superintendents across the county to address the concern of students missing too many days of school.

Starting in the early grades, millions of children are chronically absent, or missing 10 percent or more of the school year in excused and unexcused absences. “Missing just two days of school a month places students are at risk academically,” said Dr. Gildea.

About 2% of the district’s students have severe chronic absences (miss 20 percent or more of school days), and 10% of students have moderate chronic absences (miss 10-19 percent of school days).

Superintendent Gildea joins with America’s Promise Alliance, Attendance Works, the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading, Everyone Graduates Center, FutureEd, Get Schooled, Healthy Schools Campaign, the Institute for Educational Leadership, MENTOR, and United Way Worldwide, in
announcing her commitment to prioritizing student attendance.

“Reducing chronic absence is one of our top priorities,” she said. “We encourage parents and guardians to make it one of theirs. We need the help of everyone to encourage students get to class before they have missed so much instruction that they require academic remediation.”

Under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), reporting of chronic absence is now required. Local school districts are essential to ensuring chronic absence data is accurate and used to activate prevention and early intervention.

Dr. Gildea said good attendance contributes to students doing well in school and eventually in the workplace. “The early school years are essential for laying a foundation for strong attendance and academic success in future years. Each absence represents a preventable lost opportunity to learn in the classroom.”

Students are at risk academically if they are chronically absent (missing just two days a month or 10 percent of the school year). The superintendent encourages parents/guardians to avoid medical appointments and extended
trips when school is in session. She also asks parents to talk about the importance of school attendance with their students.

Board Meeting Summary | Sept. 17, 2019

Student Report

Student representative on the board, Mimi Luna, reported the school year has been off to a great start. The students held their first-ever Community Yard Sale and funds will be allocated for the Student Pantry and Student Council Coat Drive. She reminded the board that this week is Homecoming Week, complete with the first-ever Homecoming Parade, bonfire, tailgate, dance, and game against Stansbury High on Friday. Students are working on raising money for the Wounded Warrior Project as part of its community outreach effort in partnership with the Students Serving Soldiers Club. Their goal is to donate 3-5% of their revenue (from merchandise sales and activities) to a different community charity after each event.

PCEA Report

John Hall, representing the Park City Education Association, said the association’s objective is to meet the needs of members, create a vision for PCEA, increase the value of the teaching profession, and become a reliable resource for the district. He said PCEA is creating a plan that will have three areas of focus for this academic year.  Hall said some of the areas PCEA is considering include teacher retention, professional development, teacher wellness, and building relationships of trust. The association will use state professional standards, best practices, and research as it creates strategies related to its areas of focus. 

Chief Academic Officer Report

Dr. Amy Hunt said her first month in the district has been focused on listening and learning, assessing teaching, instruction needs, and establishing priorities and outcomes. Her ultimate objective is to align curriculum and instruction throughout the district. Dr. Hunt has assembled a task force that is creating a handbook that aligns the implementation of standards-based instruction.

Chief Operations Officer Report

Mike Tanner provided the board with construction projects updates and said things are running smoothly at the start of a new school year. He said finding substitute bus drivers continues to be a challenge and the district is increasing its efforts to find drivers. The district’s safety/security committee held its first meeting Tuesday morning with representation from across the district, law enforcement, city and county officials. 

Superintendent Report

Dr. Jill Gildea reported that parents have been sent emergency communications procedures in light of two recent items at schools. She invited the board and the community to attend the master planning roundtables Sept. 23-24, and an interactive community forum on Oct. 1. Dr. Gildea asked the community to stay engaged in the Future of Learning process. Superintendent Gildea’s September letter to the community is now available here.

Master Planning Update

Following 11 months of work that involved students, teachers, administrators, parents and community members, the district has received the final versions of education specifications, the facility master plan, and the analysis of existing buildings. From now until December, task forces will be working on answering these three questions:

– Does PCSD want to offer universal Pre-K and how should this be approached?

– Is there a preferred elementary/middle school option and can any of the configurations/options be eliminated?

– How extensive should the high school renovation be and how should the 9th grade be integrated?

The Master Facility Plan offers these recommendations: 

Early Learning (Hybrid Approach) 

– Maintain current elementary-school based Pre-K capacity at JRES, PPES and TSES with remodels/additions as required

– Construct Early Learning Center on Kearns Campus to address local students and additional capacity/potential universal Pre-K

 – Coordinate with community partners for potential wrap-around services 

Elementary Schools (K-5) 

– Maintain current locations, boundaries and class sizes with additions to JRES, PPES and TSES

– Relocate McPolin Elementary on the eastern edge of Kearns Campus to address Kearns campus limitations

Middle School (6-8)One Middle School vs. Two Middle Schools

– One Middle School (1,350 enrollment) – Expand EHMS with a 6th grade academy

– Two Middle Schools (~700 enrollment each) 

– Update EHMS to address current needs

–Build a second Middle School on Kearns or in another location

– Explore speciality school opportunities for middle school students

High School (9-12)

– Expand PCHS (from 1,250 to 1,850); community prefers one high school instead of two

– Classroom wing vs Specialty facility

– Classroom wing – 9th grade learning environment 

 – Remodel existing building 

 – Specialty facility (STEM, etc.) to accommodate 600 students (9-12)

During the 2019-20 school year, the district will focus on the following actions (see chart below).

Public Comment

– Chuck Klingenstein said he is hopeful that this master plan is the community’s plan. He encouraged the board to use the Steering Committee to champion the final recommendations. 

– Ali Ziesler said the district is listening to the community and said master planning efforts have been built on trust. She thanked the board for allowing community input throughout the process. 


Resumen de la Junta Directiva- Septiembre 17, 2019

Reporte Estudiantil

La representante estudiantil de la junta, Mimi Luna, informó que el año escolar ha tenido un excelente comienzo. Los estudiantes realizaron por primera vez una venta de patio comunitario y las ganancias serán utilizadas para la despensa de los estudiantes y la Obra de Abrigo del Consejo Estudiantil. Ella le recordó a la Junta que esta semana es la Semana de Bienvenida, la que por primera vez tendrá un Desfile de Bienvenida, hogueras, celebración previa al juego de foot-ball, baile, y el juego contra Stansburry High el Viernes. Los estudiantes están dedicados en recolectar dinero conjuntamente con el Students Serving Soldiers Club (Club de Estudiantes Sirviendo a los Soldados) para el Wounded Warrior Project como parte del esfuerzo de alcance comunitario. La meta es donar 3-5% de los ingresos (de venta de mercaderías y actividades) después de cada evento a diferentes obras de caridad comunitaria.

Reporte del PCEA

John Hall, representando al Park City Education Association (Asociación para la Educación), expresó que la meta de la asociación es satisfacer las necesidades de los miembros, crear una visión para el PCEA, incrementar el mérito del magisterio, y convertirse en un recurso de confianza/seguro para el distrito. Él dijo que PCEA está creando para este año académico un plan que tendrá tres áreas de enfoque. El Sr. Hall sostuvo que algunas de las áreas PCEA está considerando incluye retención de maestros, desarrollo profesional, bienestar de los maestros, y construir relaciones confiables.  La asociación usará estándares profesionales estatales, prácticas confiables, he investigará a medida que crea estrategias relacionadas con sus áreas de enfoque.

Reporte del Jefe de Operaciones Académico

La Dra. Amy Hunt dijo que su primer mes en el distrito ha estado enfocado en escuchar y aprender, evaluar maestros, necesidades en la instrucción, y establecer prioridades y resultados. Su objetivo final es alinear planes de estudios e instrucción en todo el distrito. La Dra. Hunt ha formado un grupo de trabajo que está creando un manual que alinea la implementación de la instrucción basada en estándares.

Reporte del Jefe de Operaciones

Mike Tanner proporcionó a la junta actualizaciones sobre los proyectos de construcción y dijo que todo está funcionando sin problemas al comienzo del nuevo año escolar. Él dijo que encontrar substitutos para los conductores de buses continúa siendo difícil y que el distrito está incrementando los esfuerzos para encontrar conductores. El comité de seguridad del distrito celebró su primera reunión el Martes por la mañana con representantes de todo el distrito, agentes de la ley, funcionarios de la ciudad y del condado.

Reporte de la Superintendente

La Dra. Jill Gildea informó que a los padres se les ha enviado procedimientos de comunicación de emergencia debido a dos incidentes recientes que no fueron de emergencia en las escuelas. Ella invito a la junta y a la comunidad a que asistan a la mesa redonda de planificación Septiembre 23-24, y a un foro comunitario en Octubre 1. La Dra. Gildea pidió a la comunidad que permanezca comprometida con el futuro del proceso de aprendizaje.

Actualización sobre la Planificación Maestra

Luego de 11 meses de trabajo que involucro estudiantes, maestros, administradores, padres y miembros de la comunidad, el distrito ha recibido la versión final sobre especificaciones educativas, el plan de distribución de instalaciones, y el análisis de edificios existentes. Desde ahora hasta Diciembre, los equipos de trabajo estarán ocupados para responder a estas tres preguntas:

  • ¿Quiere el PCSD ofrecer Pre-Escolar universal y se debe tratar esto?
  • ¿Existe una opción preferida de escuela primaria/intermedia y se puede eliminar cualquiera de las configuraciones/opciones?
  • ¿Que extensa debe ser la renovación de la escuela superior y como debería integrarse el 9no grado?

El Plan Maestro de Instalaciones ofrece las siguientes recomendaciones:

Aprendizaje Temprano (Enfoque Hibrido)

  • Mantener la capacidad actual de Pre-K en las escuelas elementales JRES, PPES, y TSES con las remodelaciones/adiciones que se requieran.
  • -Construir un Centro de Aprendizaje Temprano en el Campo de Kerns dirigido a estudiantes locales y para adicional capacidad/potencial del pre-K universal.
  • -Coordinar con socios de la comunidad para posibles servicios integrales.

Escuela Elemental (K-5)

  • Mantener la ubicación actual, límites y tamaños de clases con adiciones en JRES, PPES, y TSES.
  • Relocalizar la Escuela Elemental McPolin en el borde este del campus de Kearns para enfocar el problema de las limitaciones del campus de Kearns.

Escuela Intermedia (6-8)

  • Una Escuela Intermedia en vez de Dos Escuelas Intermedias.
  • Una Escuela intermedia (1,350 inscripciones)- Expandir EHMS con un 6to grado.
  • Dos Escuelas Intermedias (~700 inscritos en cada una).
  • Actualizar EHMS para abordar las necesidades actuales.
  • Construir una segunda Escuela Intermedia en Kearns o en otro lugar.
  • Explorar oportunidades escolares especiales para estudiantes de Escuelas Intermedias.

Escuela Superior (9-12)

  • Expandir PCHS (de 1,250 a 1,850)- la comunidad prefiere una escuela superior en lugar de dos.
  • Un ala del aula en vez de una instalación especializada.
  • Ala de la clase- 9no grado ambiente de Aprendizaje.
  • Remodelar el edificio existente.
  • Instalaciones para especialidades (STEM, y otros) para acomodar 600 estudiantes (9-12).

Durante en año escolar 2019-20, el distrito se enfocará en lo siguiente (ver grafico debajo)

Comentarios del Público

  • Chuck Klingenstein expresó que él tiene la esperanza de que este plan maestro sea el plan de la comunidad. El anima a la junta a valerse del comité directivo para alcanzar con éxito las recomendaciones finales.
  • Ali Ziesler dijo que el distrito está escuchando a la comunidad y que los esfuerzos de planificación maestra se han basado en la confianza. Ella agradeció a la junta por permitir la participación de la comunidad durante el proceso.

The Benefits Are Many for Students in After-School Programs

Photo courtesy of EATS Park City

Park City School District knows the benefits of after-school programs—such as improving social skills, providing academic support, making learning fun, building confidence, and providing safety and supervision. And that’s why after-school programs are offered to nearly 450 students at all four of its elementary schools as well as Ecker Hill Middle School. 

The program is held every day that school is in session, from the end of the school day until 6 p.m. “Our goal is to provide a safe, educational and enriching environment for children while providing a quality child care option for parents,” said Kimberly Patterson, program coordinator. 

Each day includes homework help, physical education and exercise, STEM and Literacy and a healthy snack. Students also get the chance to take part in monthly field trips and special enrichment programs from community partners.  Some of the field trips from the past school year included the Hogle Zoo, Discovery Gateway Children’s Museum, The Bill White Farm, Ecker Hill and Kamas pools. EATS Park City also provides cooking classes for students.

The programs are staffed with fully qualified, trained teachers and specialists who follow national after-school standards. Parents who are interested in observing the camp prior to enrollment are encouraged to stop by during camp hours and speak with the teachers.

“Our After-School Programs are truly one of the very best opportunities we provide for our students and their families,” said Patterson. “Our program is an extension of the school days with the added benefit of hands-on enrichment and learning.”

There are still openings in the program for this school year.  Parents can register any time throughout the school year, based on availability. Cost varies depending on the number of days the student attends. Scholarships are available for those who qualify. 

Those interested can learn more here and register online in English or Spanish

The After-School program is coordinated through the district’s Community Education Department with the support of the Park City Education Foundation and a generous donation this year from the United Way. 

PCHS Dance Company Preparing for National Festival

Park City High’s Dance Company has a busy year planned, including plans to attend the National High School Dance Festival, which draws the best high school dancers from around the world.

Dance Company will be spending this fall raising funds to attend the festival that will be held Feb. 26 to March 1 at Point Park University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

“We are the only high school from Utah attending,” said PCHS dance program director Ashley Mott. “We will be one of only a few public high schools attending. It is an elite festival with mostly high-level arts conservatories, and pre-professional dance high schools attending.”

Mott said this will provide the dancers with an incredible opportunity to have exposure to, and inclusion in, this kind of setting.  The festival includes hundreds of classes and workshops in all genres of dance, performances by professional companies in the evenings, and scholarship auditions where students can be evaluated by dozens of schools in one audition, at one location.

The 14-member company is hoping to raise enough funds to pay the full cost of attending the conference for each student.

Some fundraising activities include:

– Sept. 17-20: Thrift Store for PCHS students during lunches

– Oct. 30: Children’s Halloween Dance Mentoring for K-8 students, 3:30-5:30 p.m., PCHS Gym (wear costumes). Tickets at the door ($10).

– Nov. 8: Live PC Give PC (dancers will be at The Market on Nov. 2 to encourage support for their project)

– Feb. 3 & 4: Youth Dance Clinic and Halftime Performance; students learn dances on Feb. 3-4 and perform Feb. 5. Registration begins in December.

Six PCHS Seniors Named National Merit Scholar Semifinalists

Six Park City High seniors were notified today (9/11/19) that they have been selected as semifinalists in the National Merit Scholarship program. These academically talented high school seniors have an opportunity to continue in the competition for more than $31 million in scholarships that will be offered next spring.

The students include: Tosh Martin, Lane Myshrall, Owen Nagel, John Reko, Megan Stucker, and Jon Troxel.

“This is an unprecedented year. I’ve never worked in a high school where we have had six National Merit semifinalists,” said PCHS Principal Roger Arbabi. “We are so proud of the work they’ve done.”

These PCHS students now advance to the finalist level of the competition and represent 1% of U.S. high school seniors. More than 1.5 million high school juniors applied for the program.

The National Merit scholarship program was established in 1955 specifically to conduct the annual National Merit Scholarship Program. Scholarships are underwritten by NMSC with its own funds and by approximately 400 business organizations and higher education institutions that share NMSC’s goals of honoring the nation’s scholastic champions and encouraging the pursuit of academic excellence.

The 2020 National Merit Scholarship winners will be announced beginning in April and concluding in July.